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Full text of "Mary Washington College Bulletin, Summer Catalogue, March, 1978"

I ,*.***%*«*-" " 





■ 






* 

Washington College Bulle 
1978 Summer Session 



Mary Washington College does not discriminate in recruiting, admitting, 
or enrolling students on the basis of race, color, religion, physical disability, 
national origin, political affiliation, marital status, sex, or age. Complaints 
should be directed to the Vice President and AAEEO Officer, Mary Washington 
College, Box 3575 College Station, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 . 



Mary Washington College Bulletin, Summer Catalogue Issue. Volume 9, 
Number 1, March 1978. Published quarterly by Mary Washington College, 
Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 . Second Class Postage paid at the Post 
Office, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 . 



ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 



Students who wish to enroll for the summer session should file an application 
with the Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid, preferably not later than three weeks 
before the session they wish to attend. Exceptions will be made when circumstances 
justify a late application. Students who are applying for one of the courses with 
field experience or for the workshops should pay particular attention to the deadline 
dates shown with the course descriptions. 

An application fee of ten dollars ($10.00) must accompany an application for 
admission to the summer session. This fee is not refundable. 

Students currently in other colleges or who plan to enroll in other colleges 
must present a certificate of eligibility in order to enroll for summer courses at 
Mary Washington College. A form for this purpose is included in the admissions 
packet of materials. 

Talented secondary school students who have completed their junior year but 
have not been graduated must submit written approval of the principal or guidance 
counselor. 

Acceptance for the summer session does not imply acceptance for admission 
to the regular sessions of the College. Credits earned during the summer by students 
who have not been granted regular admission status to Mary Washington will be 
considered for degree credit only when regular admission is granted. 

Application forms, instructions, and registration materials may be obtained 
from the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid, Room 303, George Washington 
Hall, or by returning the form attached. 

Mary Washington College provides limited part-time employment opportunities 
to assist students in meeting summer term costs. For information and applications on 
part-time campus employment, inquiries should be directed to the Office of Admissions 
and Financial Aid after April 1 . 



HONOR SYSTEM 



Mary Washington College adheres to an honor system administered and enforced 
solely by the students. This authority is delegated to the students by the Board of 
Visitors. 

The Honor System provides that a student shall act honorably in all aspects 
of campus life. Lying, cheating, stealing, or breaking one's word of honor are 
considered infringements of the Honor System. Whenever a violation of the Honor 
System is proved, the result is usually immediate and permanent separation from the 
College. 

Every student entering the College for the first time is given a copy of the 
entire Code of the Honor System. After he has familiarized himself with its 
provisions and is certain of its meaning and obligations, he signs a pledge stating 
that he understands what is expected of him and that he realizes that a plea of 
ignorance will not be accepted by the Honor Council. Registration as a student 
in the College is not considered complete, and no grades or credits will be 
released until this card has been signed. 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



Tuition $28 per credit hour (Virginia residents) 

$56 per credit hour (Non-Virginia residents) 
Room $69 (3-week term) $92 (4-week term) 

Board $75 (3-week term) $100 (4-week term) 

Fees must be paid by the registration date. Those students who 
register by mail must send fees by the date stated in the registration 
material . Students who sign up on the registration date must pay that 
day. If financial aid has been awarded, any such award will be deducted 
from the amount due. 



WITHDRAWAL CHARGES 



Any student who drops a course or courses before the end of the drop period 
will receive a full tuition refund for these courses. After the end of the drop period, 
NO REFUND WILL BE MADE. 

Students who cancel their registration before the beginning of a course will 
receive a full refund of tuition, room, and board. 

Room and board charges for residential students who completely withdraw from 
a term or change status from residential to day: 



Room: 

Withdrawal during first week $23.00 

Withdrawal after first week 

Three-week session $69 . 00 

Four -week session $100.00 

Board: 

Per diem charge for each day in residence from the 
date the residence halls open to the date of with- 
drawal S3 . 60 per day 

Regulations concerning classification as a Virginia student will be sent with 
admission applications. 

REGISTRATION 

Students admitted to the summer session may register for classes either by mail 
up to April 28 or on the regular registration day prior to the first term they are 
attending. 

Students wishing to complete registration by mail should return the form 
on the back of this Bulletin in sufficient time to receive and return the registration 
material by April 28. Registration by mail must be accompanied by full payment 
of appropriate fees as outlined in this Bulletin. Classes will be filled on a first 
come-first served basis. 

Persons not receiving registration materials by mail may obtain them at 
registration. 

Registration for all courses and workshops will take place in the Office of 
Student Records, 215 George Washington Hall, on the days indicated in the calendar 
above between 4:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. 

Registration for Workshops 

Workshops are usually courses which are of a shorter length of time than those 
of the regular summer session. The dates for these courses are listed in the course 
descriptions. Students who plan to register for a workshop which begins on the first 
day of one of the regular terms should register on the regular registration day for 
that term at the times indicated. Students registering only for a workshop beginning 
after the first day of a regular summer term should register on the first day of the 
course at a time which does not interfere with class attendance. 



SPECIAL COURSE OFFERINGS 

The special courses described below will be offered during the 1978 Summer 
Session. Descriptions of all other courses are listed in *he 1976-78 Mary 
Washington College Catalogue. The College reserves the right to change the 
course offerings as necessitated by enrollment and availability of staff. 



CHICACOAN INDIAN ARCHEOLOGICAL RESEARCH PROJECT 
(ANTH 0500. internship-Archaeology) 



Archeological excavations will be conducted in the territory occupied by the 
historic Chicacoan (Cekacawon) chiefdom. The locality is bounded by the Coan and 
Potomac Rivers, Hull Creek, and Virginia State Highway 360 in Northumberland 
County, Virginia. 

Surveys have located a large Late Woodland and Historic period village 
(ca. A.D. 800 to European contact), Excavations at the village site and two 
nearby stratified sites are planned in order to isolate Late Woodland and Historic 
aboriginal occupations. 

The research objectives are: (!) to utilize a direct historical approach in 
identifying the Historic archeological components; (2) to study the subsistence- 
settlement strategies of the Late Woodland and Historic periods; and (3) to construct 
a local sequence of Late Woodlcnd and Historic phases. 

A typical field day will start at 6:00 a.m. with the crew on the site to 
begin work by 7:15 a.m. There will be from 30 to 45 minutes for lunch. 
Excavation will stop arcund 4:30 p.m. to begin closing-up the site, and the 
crew will leave by 5:00 p.m. Informal discussions on Middle Atlantic archeology, 
ethnohistory, and archeological techniques will be held in the evenings as time 
permits. (Additional information may be obtained from Dr. Margaret Williamson, 
Department of Sociology and Anthropology.) 



MARINE BIOLOGY 
(BIOL 352S) 

For the tenth consecutive year, the College will offer an undergraduate 
Summer Institute in Marine Biology at the Cross Rip Camp on the Chesapeake Bay 
near Deltaville, Virginia for students, teachers, and interested persons with 
sufficient background. The six-week course, which begins May 22, affords students 
a unique opportunity to blend theory or>d practical application in a setting which is 
ideal for the study of marine biology. (For additional details, contact Dr. William 
Pinschmidt, Jr., Department of Biology.) 



COMPUTER WORKSHOP 
(C^SC 201S-202S) 

The Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science will offer 
two three-credit Summer Workshops in Computer Programming and Systems. The 
general philosophy of the workshops will be to promote "hands-on" experience 
with the computer in a flexible academic atmosphere. 

Each workshop will utilize the on-campus Hewlitt-Packard 3000 real-time 
system for practical implementation and demonstration of classroom concepts. The 
student will have the opportunity to apply general systems techniques to projects 
and investigations of personal interest. 

4 



Workshop I will be offered during the first four-week summer term. Topics 
covered will include: system commands in time-shared Basic; flowcharting; 
programming in time-shared Basic; elementary file organization; and general topics 
in number representation and machine implemented arithmetic. 

Workshop II will be offered during the second four-week term. Since 
Workshop II will be an extension of the first workshop, permission of the 
instructor will be necessary for anyone wishing to participate in the second 
without attending the first. Topics covered in Workshop II will include: editing 
and manipulation of files; advanced system commands; use of peripheral file 
storage devices; and Fortran programming. (Additional information may be 
obtained from Dr. Dale A„ Brown, Department of AAathematics, Statistics, and 
Computer Science.) 



ISSUES IN LIT: FANTASY WORKSHOP 
(ENGL 0251-01) 

ENGL 0251-01 will focus on reading, evaluating, and writing fantasy 
Students will study various forms in the genre and will write short works of 
their own for in-class discussion. The course will be offered during the 
first four-week term. (Further information is available from Dr. Donald 
Glover, Department of English.) 



FILM-LITERATURE WORKSHOP FOR TEACHERS 
(ENGL 0251-02) 



A special workshop for teachers, Literature through Film, will be offered 
June 20-July 8 by the Department of English. Designed primarily for secondary 
school teachers, the course will focus extensively on film and television as means 
of developing greater student interest in both image media and literature. Lectures, 
screenings, discussions, course outline developing, and extensive workshop application 
will compose the course. (Details are available from Dr. William Kemp, Department 
of English.) 



SUMMER STUDY IN DRAMATIC ARTS 
(DRAM 250S-251S) 



In conjunction with the Fredericksburg Summer Theatre (FST), the College 
will offer a workshop in acting and technical theatre during each four-week 
summer term. In addition to attending morning classes, students in the program 
will study with experienced actors and technicians and will participate in all 
phases of the FST productions of Fiddler on the Roof, You Know I Can't Hear 
You When the Water's Running, and The Roar of the Grease Paint, The Smell 
of the Crowd. (Details on the program may be obtained from Mr. Neil Howard, 
Department of Dramatic Arts and Dance.) 



CIVIL WAR INSTITUTE 
(HIST 0471) 



The Summer Civil War Institute will be offered again this summer at Mary 
Washington College. Just as the Civil War was the watershed of American 
history, today it is the most popular era in the nation's past. Over 60,000 
books and monographs describe its many facets. Discussions of the Civil War 
habitually draw the highest student interest at all levels of education. Meanwhile, 
historians have consistently disagreed among themselves on practically every phase 
of the conflict. Thus, faced with a flood of literature and a mass of conflicting 
interpretations, both school teachers and students tend to be overwhelmed by the 
subject. 

The Summer Civil War Institute is designed to eliminate much of the 
confusion, complexity, and general misunderstanding attendant to that era. 
Of paramount importance will be an attempt to establish a totally objective 
and impartial atmosphere in which the student may carry out a scholarly analysis 
of the background, progress, and legacy of that war. 

Included in the curriculum will be morning and afternoon classroom sessions, 
special guided tours of nearby battlefields, private screenings of Hollywood productions, 
guest lecturers, banquets, informal get-togethers, and other events. (Additional 
information may be obtained from Dr. A.R. Merchent, Director of the Summer 
Session.) 



CHORAL MUSIC FOR SCHOOL 
(MUHL 471 S) 

Comprehensive survey of selected choral offerings for the school. Workshop 
participants sing and discuss choral techniques. (Further information may be obtained 
from Mr. Roger Bailey, Department of Music.) 



CHORAL MUSIC FOR CHURCH 
(MUHL 472S) 



Comprehensive survey of selected choral offerings for the church. Workshop 
participants sing and discuss choral techniques. (Further information may be obtained 
from Mr. Roger Bailey, Department of Music.) 



ORCHESTRAL MUSIC 
(MUHL 470S, MUHL 360S, and MUPR 0355) 



Three unique two credit courses dealing with orchestral music will be offered this 
summer by the Department of Music in conjunction with the Chatham Orchestra Institute 
which will be in session June 27-July 1 and July 4-8: The Orchestra and the School 
(MUHL 470S) will deal with topics of interest to those involved with school orchestra 
maintenance; Symphonic Music (MUHL 360S) will rely on score analysis for a theoretical 
and historical study of a musical genre from its roots to the present; and Orchestra 
Ensemble (MUPR 0355) will focus on orchestral literature from all periods. (Further 
information may be obtained from Dr. James Baker, Department of Music.) 



WOMEN AND SOCIETY 
(SOCG 302S) 



This course will examine the sociological concepts of Role-taking, 
Reference Group, and the Generalized Other. Using these concepts, an 
historical analysis will be made of the role of women in American Society. 
Sex discrimination will be examined, and the socio-psychological effects of 
this discrimination will be studied. The course will conclude with an 
examination of sex equality movements and organizations formed by women 
to oppose these movements. 



WOMEN AND POWER 
(SOCG 306S) 



To be offered during the second four-week term, Women and Power has been 
designed to encourage an awareness of the effect of power upon women and of the 
types of responses women have traditionally made to power structures. The 
prerequisite course is Women and Society (SOCG 302S) . (Further details are 
available from Dr. Clyde Carter, Department of Sociology.) 



1978 SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR 



Three-Week Term 



First Second 

Four-Week Term Four-Week Term 



Residence halls open 
at 1:30 p.m. 

Registration from 

4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

Classes begin 

Last day to add courses 

Last day to drop courses 
or change P/F without 
penalty and full payment 
of tuition 

Last day to drop course 
without automatic F 

Classes end 

Residence halls close 
at 9:30 a.m. 



Mon., May 15 

Man., May 15 

Tues., May 16 
Wed., May 17 
Fri., May 19 



Mon., May 29 



Fri., June 2 



Mon., June 5 

Mon., June 5 

Tues., June 6 
Wed., June 7 
Fri., June 9 



Fri., June 30 
Sat., July 1 



Wed., July 5 

Wed., July 5 

Thurs., July 6 
Fri., July 7 
Mon., July 10 



Mon., June 26 Wed., July 26 



Tues., August 1 
Wed., August 2 



SCHEDULE OF COURSES 
Summer Session 1978 



Three-Week Term 



DSC 



ANTH 

ARTS 

ARTS 

BIOL 

CPSC 

DANC 

DANC 

ECON 

ECON 

EDUC 

ENGL 

ENGL 

GEOG 

HIST 

PHED 

PHED 

PHED 

PHYS 

PSCI 

PSYC 

PSYC 

PSYC 



CRS 

0500 

0102 

0300 

251S 

0101 

0123 

0223 

0101 

0341 

0205 

0231 

0236 

0212 

0303 

0133 

150S 

0415 

0462 

0201 

0101 

0102 

0331 



SUP 



PSYC 0345 - 
SOCG 0202 - 
SOCG 0351 - 

Firsf Four- Week Term 



SCN 
~0l~ 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 

01 
01 
01 



TITLE 



Internship-Archaeology - 1-3 
Three-Dimensional Design 
Introduction to Photography 
History of Biology 
Introduction to Computers - 2 

Modern Dance - 1 cr. 

Modern Dance - 1 cr . 

Elements of Economics 
Government Finance 

Children's Literature 

Short Fiction 

Comedy 

World Cultural Geography 

The Old South 

Tennis — 1 cr. 

First Aid - 1 cr. 

Water Safety Instruction -1 cr. 

Advanced Nuclear Physics 

American Government 

General Psychology 

General Psychology 

Developmental Psychology: 

The Infant and Child 

Psychology of Learning 

Social Problems 

Juvenile Delinquency 



TIME 



ROOM 



cr- TBA TBA 

9:00-noon Mel 252 

2:00-5:00 Mel 153 

9:00-noon S 208 

6:00-9:00 MTWTh S 3 

2:00-5:00 G 4 

2:00-5:00 G 5 

2:00-5:00 duP 101 

9 : 00-noon duP 107 

6:00-9:00 duP 108 

2:00-5:00 C 20 

9:00-noon C 20 

9:00-noon duP 102 

9:00-noon duP 103 

9:00-noon Gym 1 

9:00-noon G 101 

6:00-9:00 Pool 

9:00-noon S 203A 

2:00-5:00 duP 107 

9:00-noon C 6 

2:00-5:00 C 6 

9:00-noon C 14 

2.00-5:00 C 15 

9:00-noon duP 104 

9:00-noon duP 106 



INSTRUCTOR 



Williamson 

Muick 

Hara 

M. Pinschmidt 

Lindsey 

Graham 

Gray 

Rycroft 

Cushman 

B. Smith 

Lucas 

Hanna 

Palmieri 

Crawley 

Hegmann 

Kintzing 

Droste 

Atalay 

Kramer 

Bill 

Weinstock 

Moeller 

Puhakka 

London 

Sletten 



ARTS 
ARTS 
ARTS 
ASTR 
BIOL 
BIOL 
CHEM 



ENGL 
ENGL 
ENGL 



0251 
0381 
270S 
0201 
0121 
0121 
0111 



CHEM 0211 

CPSC 0101 

CPSC 20 IS 

DRAM 250S 

DRAM 250S 

ECON 0201 

ECON 0371 

EDUC 0249 



0232 
0251 
0375 



ENGL 0375 



LB 



CHEM 0111 LB 
CHEM 0211 - 



LB 



01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 

01 
01 

01 
01 
01 

01 

02 

01 
01 
01 

01 
01 
01 

02 



Pottery and Hand-Building 

Advanced Pottery 

Painting and Drawing for Beginners 

Elementary Astronomy 

Biological Concepts - 4 cr . 

General Chemistry - 4 cr . 



Organic Chemistry - 4 cr , 



Introduction to Computers - 2 cr 
Workshop I in Computer 
Programming & Systems 
Fredericksburg Summer Theatre 



Principles of Economics 

Microeconomics 

Phys. Ed. for Elementary School 

Children - 2 cr . 

The Novel 

Issues in Lit: Fantasy Workshop 

Special Studies: Contemporary 

American Poets 

Special Studies: Selected Works 

of Henry James — —. 

9 



10:15-12:15 

1:00-3:00 

7:00-9:00 

7:00-9:00 

8:00-12:15 

8:00-12:15 

8:00-9:00 & 

1:30-2:30 

9:15-12:15 MWF 

8:00-9:00 & 

1:30-2:30 

9:15-12:15 MWF 

8:00-9:20 

7:00-9:00 MTWTh 

9:00-noon 



9:00-noon 

10:15-12:15 

1:00-3:00 

10:15-12:15 

3:15-5:15 

10:15-12:15 

8:00-10:00 

1:00-3:00 



Mel 56 
Mel 56 
Mel 251 
S 203A 
S 203A 
S 206 
S 308 



304 
300 



S 305 
S 3 
S 3 

Klein Theatre 

Klein Theatre 

duP 106 
duP 101 
Aux. Gym 

C 20 
C 20 
C 20 

C 20 



Hara 

Hara 

DiBella 

Nikolic 

Parrish 

Parrish 

Cover 

Cover 
Gratz 

Gratz 

Lindsey 

Brown 

Howard, 

Larson 

Howard, 

Larson 

Cushman 

Rycroft 

Gordon 

Lucas 

Glover 

Glover 

Lucas 



DSC 


CRS 


SUF 


SCN 


TITLE 


TIME 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


FREN 


0151 


- 


01 


Intermediate French 


10:15-12:15 


duP 103 


Manolis 


GEOG 


0275 


- 


01 


Human Environment: Perception 
& Utilization 


7:00-9:00 


du? 102 


Gouger 


HLTH 


0100 


- 


01 


Contemoorary Health Problems 


8:00-10:00 


G 101 


Hegmann 


HIST 


0223 


- 


01 


Civil War, Reconstruction, 
& the Gilded Age 


8:00-10:00 


duP 107 


Tracy 


HIST 


0235 


- 


01 


Early Modern Europe 


7:00-9:00 


duP 103 


Warper 


HIST 


0307 


- 


01 


Social & Intellectual History 
of the U.S. 


10:1 5-1 2: 15 


duP 107 


Tracy 


MATH 


0101 


- 


01 


Introduction to Mathematics 


8:00-10:00 


S 1 


Pierce 


MATH 


0121 


- 


01 


Calculus I 


10:15-12:15 


S 1 


Pierce 


MATH 


0491 


- 


01 


Selected Topics in Mathematics 


10:15-12:15 


S 3 


Lindsey 


PHIL 


0151 


- 


01 


Introduction to Logic & Language 


3:15-5:15 


C 2 


Van Sant 


PHED 


0113 


- 


01 


individual Exercise - 1 cr . 


7:00-9:00 


Aux Gym 


Kintzing 


PHED 


0115 


- 


01 


Swimming - 1 cr . 


10:15-12:15 


Pool 


Greenberg 


PHED 


0133 


- 


02 


Tennis - 1 cr . 


8:00-10:00 


Gym 1! 


Greenberg 


PHED 


0133 


- 


03 


Tennis - 1 cr. 


10:15-12:15 


Gym S 


Hegmann 


PSCI 


0101 


- 


01 


Introduction to Political Science 


7:00-9:00 


duP 107 


Fickett 


PSCI 


0301 


- 


01 


Comparative Government 1 


3:15-5:15 


duP 107 


Fickett 


PSYC 


0101 


- 


02 


General Psychology 


8:00-10:00 


C 6 


Bill 


PSYC 


0102 


- 


02 


General Psychology 


10:15-12:15 


C 6 


Weinstock 


PSYC 


0311 


- 


01 


Abnormal Psychology 


8:00-10:00 


C 1 A 


Nissim-Sabat 


PSYC 


325S 


- 


01 


Educational Psychology 


3:15-5:15 


C 10 


Weinstock 


PSYC 


0342 


- 


01 


Psychology of Personality 


10:15-12:15 


C ,15 


Nissim-Sabat 


RELG 


0271 


- 


01 


Studies in Faith & Literature 


10:15-12:15 


duP 108 


Cain 


SOCG 


0201 


- 


01 


Principles of Sociology 


10:15-12:15 


duP 104 


Sletten 


SOCG 


302S 


- 


01 


Women and Society 


8:00-10:00 


duP 104 


DeAngelo 


SOCG 


0363 


- 


01 


Soc. Research: Data Analysis 


1 :0Q-3:0G 


duP 104 


Sletten 


SPAN 


0151 


- 


01 


Intermediate Spanish 


8 


00--* 0:00 


duP 103 


Pena 


Second 


Four -Week Ter 


m 










ARTS 


0351 


_ 


01 


Painting 


10:15-12:15 


Mel 251 


DiBella 


ASTR 


0202 


- 


01 


Elementary Astronomy 


7 


00-9:00 


S 203A 


Nikolic 


BIOL 


0122 


- 


01 


Biological Concepts - 4 cr. 


8 


00-12:15 


S 203A 


Fuller 


BIOL 


0122 


LB 


01 




o 


00-12:15 


S 206 


Fuller 


BIOL 


0252 


- 


01 


General Ecology 


3 


15-5:15 


S 203A 


Bass 


BIOL 


0342 


- 


01 


Human Genetics - 4 cr. 


6 


00-10:00 


S 206 


Parrish 


CHEM 


0112 


- 


01 


General Chemistry - 4 cr . 


8 

i 


00-9:00 & 
30-2:30 


S 308 


Cover 


CHEM 


0112 


LB 


01 




9 


15-12:15 MWF 


S 30-* 


Cover 


CHEM 


0212 


- 


01 


Organic Chemistry - 4 cr. 


8 
1 


00-9:00 & 
30-2:30 


S 300 


Gratz 


CHEM 


0212 


LB 


01 




9 


15-12:15 MWF 


S 305 


Gratz 


CPSC 


202S 


- 


01 


Workshop II in Computer 


7 


00-9:00 MTWTh 


S 3 


Brown 










Programming & Systems 








DRAM 


251S 


- 


01 


Fredericksburg Summer Theatre 


9:00-riOOT 


Klein Theatre 


Howard, 
Larson 


DRAM 


251 S 


- 


02 




9:00-noon 


Klein Theatre 


Howard, 
Larson 


ECON 


0202 


- 


01 


Principles of Economics 


10:15-12:15 


duP 101 


Rycroft 


ECON 


0372 


- 


01 


Macroeconomics 


1:00-3:00 


duP 106 


Cushman 


ENGL 


0231 


- 


02 


Short Fiction 


7:00-9:00 


C 20 


Singh 


ENGL 


0320 


- 


01 


Shakespeare: The Later Plays 


1 :00~3:00 


C 20 


Kemp 


ENGL 


0376 


- 


01 


Special Studies: Love in the 
Novel of Exotic Setting 


3:15-5:15 


C 20 


Singh 


FREN 


0152 


- 


01 


Intermediate French 


10:15-12:15 


duP 103 


Manolis 


HIST 


0224 


- 


01 


Twentieth Century America 


8:00-10:00 


duP 104 


Crawley 


HIST 


0236 


- 


01 


Modern Europe 


7:00-9:00 


duP 103 


Warner 


HIST 


0308 


- 


01 


Social 5. intellectual History 
of the U.S. 


10:15-12:15 


duP 107 


Tracy 


MATH 


0111 


- 


01 


Precalculus 


8:00-10:00 


S 1 


Conroy 


MATH 


0221 


- 


01 


Calculus 1! 


1 


3:15-12:15 


S 1 


Conroy 



DCS 



CRS SUF SCN 



PHED 


0133 


PHED 


0133 


PSCI 


0102 


PSCI 


0356 


SOCG 


306S 


SOCG 


0312 


SPAN 


0152 


SPCH 


0261 


SPCH 


0302 



TITLE 


TIME 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


Tennis- 1 cr. 


8:00-10:00 


Gym 1 


Gordon 


Tennis - 1 cr. 


10:15-12:15 


Gym 1 


Gordon 


Introduction to Political Science II 


7:00-9:00 


duP 107 


Kramer 


American Foreign Policy 


1:00-3:00 


duP 107 


Kramer 


Women and Power 


1:00-3:00 


duP 104 


DeAngelo 


Comparative Community Studies 


7:00-9:00 


duP 104 


London 


Intermediate Spanish 


8:00-10:00 


duP 103 


Pena 


Voice and Diction 


7:00-9:00 


duP 215 


Duke 


Public Speaking 


3:15-5:15 


duP 211 


Duke 



04 
05 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 
01 



Courses Offered ul Special Times 

BIOL 352S - 01 Marine Biology - 6 cr. 



* Teaching Music in the Elementary 
School (see MUED 0359) 
Supervised Teaching - 9 cr. 

Issues in Lit: Film in the 
Literature Classroom 
**Field Methods 

**Field Geography 



HIST 0471 - 01 Civil War Institute 

In conjunction with the Chatham Orchestra Institute: 

MUPR 0355 - 01 Orchestra Ensemble - 2 cr . 

MUHL 360S - 01 Symphonic Music - 2 cr. 

MUHL 470S - 01 The Orchestra and the School - 

2 cr. 



EDUC 


0317 - 


01 


EDUC 


0440 - 


01 


ENGL 


0251 


02 


GEOG 


0417 - 


01 


GEOG 


0418 - 


01 



MUED 0359 

MUPR HIS 

MUHL 471S 

MUHL 472S 



01 ***Music for the Elementary 
Classroom Teacher (see 
Education 0317) 

01 Class Guitar - 1 cr . 

01 Choral Music for School - 1 cr. 

01 Choral Music for Church - 1 cr. 



May 22-June 30 
Cross Rip Camp 
Deltaville, Va. 
June 12-23 
8:00-12:15 
May 16-August 26 



Pol 33 



duP 211 



June 26-July 14 

9:00-noon 

May 29-July 8 

Field Trip to Western States 

May 29-July 8 

Field Trip to Western States 



June 18-July 
June 25- July 
7:00-9:00 
3:15-5:15 
June 26-30 & 
July 3-7 
8:00-10:00 
June 12-23 
8:00-12:15 



July 6-20 
7:00-9:00 MTWTh 
June 12-16 
7:00-9:40 
June 5-9 
7:00-9:40 



duP 110 

Pol 36 
Pol 234 
Pol 234 



Pol 33 

Pol 33 

Pol 33 

Pol 33 



W. Pinschmidt 

Baker 

Slayton, 
Zisman, Smith 
Kemp 

Bowen 

Bowen 

Robertson 

Baker 

Norwood 

Baker 

Baker 

Richardson 

Bailey 

Bailey 



NOTE: Fifteen semester hours of credit plus one hour of physical education may be earned during the summer session. 
Maximum student load may be two courses during each four-week term and/or one course in the three-week 
term. Except as indicated, each course carries a credit of three semester hours. Classes meet daily, Monday 
through Friday, unless noted otherwise. For complete course descriptions, see the Mary Washington College 
Academic Catalogue. 

DSC-Discipline; CRS=-Course; SUF Suffix; SCN-Section. 

C indicates Chandler Hall; Mel, Melchers Hall; duP, duPont Hall; Pol, Pollard Hall; S, Combs Science Hall; 
G, Goolrick Hall. 

*EDUC 0317-01. Restricted for music majors. 
**GEOG 0417-0418. One must register for both courses. 
***MUED 0359-01. Restricted for education certification. 

The College reserves the right to change the course offerings as necessitated by enrollment and availability of 
staff. 



11 






TO: DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND FINANCIAL AID 
MARY WASHINGTON COLLEGE 
BOX 1098 COLLEGE STATION 
FREDERICKSBURG, VIRGINIA 22401 



Please send Summer Session 1978 application and registration materials to: 
Print Name 



first 



ddT 



miaaie 



last 



Address 



number and street 



city or town 



state 



ZIP code 



mmmmmm- 



Mary 


Fredericksburg, 


Washington 


Virginia 


College 


22401 



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